The Big Picture

Welcome to Rockaoke Live! v2.0, or, a thing we like to call SetCrafter

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This Shopify storefront site is in progress and not operational (beta). Our $1 "jukebox" function is for demonstration only at the moment, but will allow event planners and potential singers to select songs using this website. Please stand by as changes, edits, and fixes are being made. For booking enquiries, contact us directly at rockaokelive604@gmail.com
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"What I am trying to get at is how we shift our focus from things to context, because if we actually spend more time shaping context, things naturally happen."   

- John Seely Brown, USC
"Learning in and for the 21st Century"


The underlying premise of this entire customizable and interactive live music experience is really just about shaping contexts into an excuse for people to get together, sing songs, and have fun! Of course when you throw an "-oke" on to the end of any word, that context can lose some seriousness, especially as an object of study. Probably a good thing!

All fun included, there's been a lot of serious thought built into how this entire platform works from user perspectives and actions, to technology infrastructures and applications, to value propositions and motivations. Figuring out how the licensing of "mechanical" and "synchronization" rights for public vs. private spaces is a significant question happening in the karaoke industry right now:

"We spend a large amount of time and effort securing license and compliance."

- David Grimes, spokesperson for DigiTrax

In a sense, this concept is a big digital age design experiment – and potentially an applied PhD project. The objective is to figure out how to create value through interactive experiences that use "building blocks" of a large collection of songs, learned and played live on stage by a real band!

The big picture for this platform is a live music experience that works for formal, semi-formal, and informal audiences at events. These include events that are:

    • open to the public for building community is local spaces,
    • for fundraising for causes and charities, 
    • "ice-breaker" networking events and meetups,
    • sponsorship, marketing, and promotionally-driven,
    • for internal corporate HR and/or team-building, or
    • private events such as weddings and special occasions.

In this big picture view are two separate industries that our events target: (1) the global craft beer industry, but at the local community event level; and (2) startup company marketing, specifically where companies are looking for face-to-face interaction with early adopters and potential clients in a fun environment.

These two markets are not mutually exclusive, given both their influence on North American west coast markets from southern California to the Bay Area to the Pacific Northwest. Yet the rest of the North American market also fits with these two industries – with particular focus on Toronto, New York, Chicago, and Austin – as does Europe with the Lille-based Recisio as a tech company we're very interested in

Australia has already been identified as a location where future efforts will be directed, in conjunction with R&D opportunities at Queensland University of Technology. Finally, because of the interactive karaoke aspect added to live music, we also want to eventually target Asian technology hubs and developing craft beer markets in those regions.

Playful tinkering and reframing...

What's been called a "radically opposite approach" to startup marketing has been a 2012 campaign by a big data startup called STOIC, located in in several key markets globally. Instead of driving as many "e-mail signups, likes, tweets, follows, +1’s, retweets, diggs, reddits, shares, repins and retumbles as possible", STOIC instead spent $400k to stage 100 face-to-face marketing "meetups" in 40 different countries.

The goal for STOIC was to "have the right kind of conversations" by meeting with up to 5000 people directly (in different places, not all at once!)...

“The meetups take a lot of time, and it will cost quite a bit of money. Around $400K when including travels expenses for two people and the fees of renting meeting rooms in hotels and serving soft drinks. But we could not think of a better way to spend that time and money in order to get 5,000 champions around the world.”

- Ismael Ghalimi, STOIC founder

The idea for SetCrafter™ is to tinker with this same marketing "meetup" model, but with an networking and entertainment component with a consistent, repeatable format. SetCrafter™ then takes the event up a level by getting it out of the hotel meeting room environment and into a more lively and playful venue for people to connect.

"It’s the Aerosmith approach to startup marketing – get on the road and tour, baby!"

Each event venue would include a stage, a screen, and all necessary audiovisual tools for demo presentations, followed by an informal and interactive live music event with The Naturals and hosted by Dr. Goulet. If put together properly, almost all the needed equipment could be sourced locally for rental, so no need for a 1970s-style tour bus... Then again, a travelling Airstream® might also be fun!

And here's the twist (of the cap, if you will)...

These marketing meetups create a built-in audience for local craft beer sponsors to gain brand awareness through: (a) supplying beer and cider products to the audience rather than supplying only soft drinks, (b) sponsoring the event themes and/or singing spots in the "Invitational" format sets. Some of these craft beer sponsors might sign up for multiple tour stops in their region, or might be one-offs, or might be sponsors outside of craft beer. The SetCrafter™ platform is flexible and scaleable for these situations. 

Now this reframed multi-city startup marketing campaign is starting to feel like a rock n' roll tour! It even has built-in (craft) beer sponsorship, as concert tours do, as well as added audiovisual elements to further engage the audience. So what's next for trying to get to this big picture? An MVP (minimum viable product) needs to be developed for a touring version of concept. Some of this work is already happening HERE.

And for more about STOIC's very interesting meetups model, have a look at the full article from Whiteboard Magazine:

http://www.whiteboardmag.com/this-startup-is-spending-400k-to-meet-5000-customers-face-to-face-in-40-countries/